Chefs Backstage At Sinema | Nashville Guru

 Chefs Backstage is a new dinner series at Sinema and will take place once a month July through October. The events will feature different chefs from around Nashville who will work with Sinema Chef Kyle Patterson. Each meal will be different as the chefs prepare foods they enjoy eating in a family-style setting. Each dinner is $100 per person and includes a cocktail reception, dinner with pairings, and tax and gratuity.   Read more on Nashville Guru  here .

Chefs Backstage is a new dinner series at Sinema and will take place once a month July through October. The events will feature different chefs from around Nashville who will work with Sinema Chef Kyle Patterson. Each meal will be different as the chefs prepare foods they enjoy eating in a family-style setting. Each dinner is $100 per person and includes a cocktail reception, dinner with pairings, and tax and gratuity. 

Read more on Nashville Guru here.

Sinema’s Bottomless Brunch and Chefs Backstage Dinner Series | eat.drink.smile.

 Is there any human being that doesn’t think brunch is awesome? If so, they’re a weirdo. Sorry, but brunch is the best. I love to stuff myself and drink lots of mimosas and coffee and then stuff myself some more. Brunch is the one meal where I have no problem with dining from a buffet. Actually, I prefer it!  Lucky for me, Sinema launched a Bottomless Brunch a while back, and man, do they have it all covered.  Read more on eat.drink.smile  here .

Is there any human being that doesn’t think brunch is awesome? If so, they’re a weirdo. Sorry, but brunch is the best. I love to stuff myself and drink lots of mimosas and coffee and then stuff myself some more. Brunch is the one meal where I have no problem with dining from a buffet. Actually, I prefer it!

Lucky for me, Sinema launched a Bottomless Brunch a while back, and man, do they have it all covered.

Read more on eat.drink.smile here.

As Reservations Become Ubiquitous, Restaurants Grapple With Technology | Nashville Scene

 Tere are lots of upsides to becoming a good dining town, but ease when it comes to getting a table isn’t one of them.  As Nashville has slowly grown into a destination for diners over the past decade, one of the byproducts of that success has been the need to make a reservation. In Old Nashville, you probably needed a reservation only for a couple of places, like Arthur’s or Mario’s. But now? If it’s a weekend at one of our top restaurants, forget it. Those seats are gone.  Read more on the  Nashville Scene.

Tere are lots of upsides to becoming a good dining town, but ease when it comes to getting a table isn’t one of them.

As Nashville has slowly grown into a destination for diners over the past decade, one of the byproducts of that success has been the need to make a reservation. In Old Nashville, you probably needed a reservation only for a couple of places, like Arthur’s or Mario’s. But now? If it’s a weekend at one of our top restaurants, forget it. Those seats are gone.

Read more on the Nashville Scene.

THE BEST BRUNCHES IN NASHVILLE | Thrillist

 Nashville used to be pretty much a desert when it came to brunch, but now your Sunday Funday options abound. While the lines to get in make you wonder what all these people did for weekend meals before Music City became a hotbed of breakfast served late, here are some options to ensure you can do better than a McMuffin and a cup of Zing Zang torqued up with Aristocrat vodka.  Read more on  Thrillist .

Nashville used to be pretty much a desert when it came to brunch, but now your Sunday Funday options abound. While the lines to get in make you wonder what all these people did for weekend meals before Music City became a hotbed of breakfast served late, here are some options to ensure you can do better than a McMuffin and a cup of Zing Zang torqued up with Aristocrat vodka.

Read more on Thrillist.

Sinema Rolls Out New Bottomless Brunch Program | NAshville Scene

 Some of you young whippersnappers may not believe it, but Nashville hasn’t always been a brunch town. As opposed to now, where just about every restaurant in town offers a separate weekend menu to cater to hungover bachelorette parties and locals looking for a morning splurge, there was a time when the only special brunches were at hotels and mega buffets like New Orleans Manor or 101st Airborne.  Read more on the  Nashville Scene.

Some of you young whippersnappers may not believe it, but Nashville hasn’t always been a brunch town. As opposed to now, where just about every restaurant in town offers a separate weekend menu to cater to hungover bachelorette parties and locals looking for a morning splurge, there was a time when the only special brunches were at hotels and mega buffets like New Orleans Manor or 101st Airborne.

Read more on the Nashville Scene.

Sinema's Bottomless Brunch | Nashville Guru

  Sinema  recently launched   Bottomless Brunch  , a new Sunday brunch program offering buffet-style stations for one fee of  $28 per person.  Children ages 6-12 are $12. Children 5 & under are free.  A La Carte items are an additional charge.   Bottomless Brunch is  every Sunday from 10am to 2pm . Reservations and walk-ins are both accepted. Read more on  Nashville Guru.

Sinema recently launched Bottomless Brunch, a new Sunday brunch program offering buffet-style stations for one fee of $28 per person. Children ages 6-12 are $12. Children 5 & under are free.  A La Carte items are an additional charge. Bottomless Brunch is every Sunday from 10am to 2pm. Reservations and walk-ins are both accepted. Read more on Nashville Guru.

5 to Try: You'll wish you hadn’t given these up for Lent | The Tennessean

 

Before juicing was a thing, those in the know were doing Bloody Marys. I mean, let’s not pretend people aren’t adding alcohol to their kale, banana and asparagus smoothies. It’s the only way to get some of those combos down. But the Bloody Mary combines the wholesome nutrition of tomato juice with the boss-stress reducing properties of vodka, plus vegetables as garnish. It practically SCREAMS “healthy.” At Sinema, you can customize your, shall we say, brunch juice with everything from olives to hot sauce at their bottomless Bloody Mary Bar. Aw, yeah. Free bloody refills, people. Read more on The Tennessean.

3 5 to Try: Booze infused | The Tennessean

  It’s all fine and well to let a smile be your umbrella, but frankly sometimes you just need the alcohol. Bartenders — I mean mixologists — are increasingly coming up with ways to add booze to our non-boozy beverages. And chefs have never been shy about tarting up a dish with a little beer, wine or whiskey. Here are five ways to celebrate the boozification of everything. Red more on the  Tennessean . 

It’s all fine and well to let a smile be your umbrella, but frankly sometimes you just need the alcohol. Bartenders — I mean mixologists — are increasingly coming up with ways to add booze to our non-boozy beverages. And chefs have never been shy about tarting up a dish with a little beer, wine or whiskey. Here are five ways to celebrate the boozification of everything. Red more on the Tennessean

248 Is Nashville's dining scene saturated? | The Tennesseean

The Nashville area has gained 490 restaurants since 2010. But how much is too much?

When Arnold Myint’s family broke into the Nashville restaurant business in the 1970s, there was no “it city” moniker, no James Beard awards and barely any food scene at all...

“About five years ago we got all this national attention with 'it city' and the TV show. I think everyone thought they could come here, put their name on a restaurant, make some investment and it was going to be a home run. Ten years ago that was the case, maybe even five years ago. Today, that is definitely not the case,” said Sam Reed of Reed Hospitality Group, which owns Sinema and decided in November to close casual seafood restaurant The Hook.

Read more on The Tennesseean